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Monday, August 21, 2017

58Days 03Hours 15Minutes 16Seconds

Partial Phase Start: 01:08:59 p.m.
Totality Start: 02:37:50 p.m.
Totality Time: 2m 34s
Maximum Totality: 02:39:07 p.m.
Ends: 04:03:00 p.m.
(Sources: Eclipse2017.org, TimeAndDate.com)

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE VIEWING AREAS

City of Anderson

Other

 

COMING SOON:
Total Solar Eclipse Glasses will be available for $1 each at the Anderson Recreation Center while supplies last.
Expected availability is late June.

Total Solar Eclipse Anderson SC August 21 2017

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE EVENTS

 FRIDAY

Movie Night
“Lego Batman”
8:20 p.m.
Friday, August 18
Carolina Wren Park
Chairs and food allowed.
No alcohol or glass.

 SUNDAY

Electric City Lights Out Festival
on Federal Street
5:30-7:30 p.m.
Local products, food, beverage, and entertainment

MONDAY

Anderson Recreation Center
1-3 p.m.
Chairs and food allowed.
No alcohol or glass.
Music

Carolina Wren Park
1-3 p.m.
Chairs and food allowed.
No alcohol or glass.
Music

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE FACTS

  • Due to abundant media coverage, summer weather, easy access, and people’s willingness to travel, astronomers predict the 2017 total solar eclipse will be one of the most viewed ever.
  • A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and Earth.
  • The sun is 400 times larger than the moon, but 400 times farther away, creating the appearance that they’re the same size.
  • The shadow cast from the moon onto Earth may cause night-like darkness, birds to roost, and temps to drop up to 15 degrees.
  • Totality will occur over 14 states (in manner of procession): Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.
  • The next total solar eclipse over the U.S. will occur on April 28, 2024.
  • Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri are the only states in which the total solar eclipses can be seen in both 2017 and 2024.
  • The last time a total solar eclipse occurred over the U.S. was the 1970s. There were two (1971, 1979).
  • Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity was confirmed with the help of a total solar eclipse on May 29, 1919, since referred to as “probably the most important eclipse in the history of science.”

Sources: Astronomy Magazine, Space